App Reviews /

ePST Review

ePST Screenshots
Credibility

Credibility

5.00 / 5.00

Overall Score: 11/11

Consumer Ratings:
Clarity of Purpose: 2/2
Mechanism of Action: 1/1
Software Updates:
Clinical Input in Development: 1/1
Research on Development Process: 1/1
Efficacy of Other Products: 1/1
Research Independence and Review: 2/2
Research Base: 3/3

Note: Consumer Ratings and Software Update Scores are not available for Web Apps

Rating Date: February 2023

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User Experince

User Experience

Not Yet Available
Transparency

Transparency

Not Yet Available
Professional Reviews

Professional Review

Not Yet Available

ePST (electronic Problem-solving Treatment) is a web-based program aimed at reducing symptoms of mood disorders, stress, and anxiety through Problem Solving Therapy which is based on cognitive behavioral therapy. A virtual coach guides the user through a six step program: stating a problem, setting a goal, brainstorming solutions, choosing a solution, making an action plan, and enjoyable activities. The virtual coach provides personalized feedback and interactive activities. ePST records users’ self-assessments in order to track their progress. ePST will cost users $420, which includes six digital sessions guided by a virtual coach.

Technical Details

Available for: Web Browser
Developer: Evermind
Type of Treatment: Cognitive Behavioral Principles
Targeted Conditions: Mood Disorders, Stress and Anxiety
Target Audience: Not Specified
Designed to be used in conjunction with a professional? No
Languages Available: English
Cost: $252.00
Get it on: Web

Research on this App

This study wanted to evaluate the efficacy of an interactive media-based, computer-delivered depression treatment program, the program being ePST. 45 participants with major depressive disorder or dysthymia were randomized to either a condition that received 6 weekly sessions of ePST (n= 25) or a control condition that received nothing at all (n= 20). The primary outcome measure was the Beck Depression Inventory II. It was found that those in the experimental group had a significantly greater reduction in depressive symptoms compared to those in the control condition. 40% of the participants in the experimental group showed clinically significant and reliable changes in depression while none in the control condition met this criterion. (Sandoval et al., 2017, https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0005789416300090?via%3Dihub)

This pilot study aimed to test the efficacy of a computer-guided problem solving treatment (ePST) for reducing symptoms of depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and insomnia in student military veterans. 24 student veterans were recruited for this study with symptoms of depression and were randomly assigned to either a treatment group (six weekly sessions of ePST) or minimal contact control group. Participants completed questionnaires of depression, PTSD, and insomnia at baseline and post treatments. Results showed improvements in depression, PTSD, and insomnia symptoms. (Bedford, Dietch, Taylor, Boals, & Zayfert, 2017, https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0005789417301284)

This feasibility study wanted to evaluate the usability, acceptability, credibility, therapeutic alliance and efficacy of ePST. 29 people took part in this study. Depressive symptoms and health-related functioning were assessed at baseline, treatment midpoint and study endpoint. Depression outcomes were compared to previously published research on live PST and computer based depression therapy. Participants used the program for 9 weeks which comprised of 6 ePST sessions. They reported that a therapeutic alliance comparable to that observed in live therapy. Depressive symptoms improved significantly over time as well. Where at baseline, 83% of ePST participants met criteria for either or both major depressive disorder or dysthymic disorder. Then at the end of the trial that number dropped to 18% of participants who met the criteria for either or both major depression or dysthymia. (Sandoval et al., 2017, https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0005789416300090?via%3Dihub)

How we evaluate

We review apps against rating criteria developed by experts in the field. Some of those criteria are:

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Credibility

We look at the research supporting the technology and the credibility of the development process.

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Transparency

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User Experience

We explore how fun, functional, easy-to-use, engaging, and interesting the technology is.

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Professional Reviews

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One Mind Psyberguide Update
Thank you for your interest in One Mind PsyberGuide. Due to a loss of funding, we are no longer updating or maintaining the One Mind PsyberGuide website. Reviews have been updated as of the last date indicated on each review. Other activities at One Mind PsyberGuide stopped in June 2023. We hope this website can still serve as a resource for those interested in using technology to support people and their mental health. We thank everyone for their support of One Mind PsyberGuide over the years.